TLC sAw Stlye

JohnsonswaxThe summer is here and I hope everyone is enjoying it. Your friend and saw monger has been busy! Finishing up the spring meets in the area, getting things posted for sale, and recently buying a new car! Something at 44 is one of the few firsts left. .

I know the blog posts have been few and far between; excuses, excuses but I’ve had a few requests to talk about TLC saw style. The good news is once they are restored and/or in good condition they don’t require a lot of special care. So with that in mind I thought I’d share a few tips and best practices I follow.

Let’s start with storage. Rule numero uno: Don’t store the blade bent! It’s the best practice you can follow and not really hard to avoid with a little care. Some guys like pegs and others fancy tills. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Pegs lay one handle against another and you may need to dig and shuffle with multiple saws that can lead to dings or drops. Tills are another option and come in all types, designs and complexity. Again the key is the blades aren’t bent while in storage.

Mike Wenzloff once said to me, “Wax is a saw’s best friend,” or as I like to say, “Friction is a bitch.” Either way rust isn’t smooth. If you bought a saw from me it had Johnson’s Paste Wax on it. I average about a tin a year and just finished one a few weeks ago. I can’t give you a number but it’s easily over a hundred plates. The other benefit of wax is rust prevention.  However if you feel wax just dulls all that elbow grease and your goal is shining chrome polish, some aluminum foil followed by a buff with a clean rag works as well. It sounds crazy but talk to anyone who’s restored a bike with pitted chrome and they’ll tell you it works. You may find that fine steel wool works in place of the foil, but I find for rust prevention that wax wins and can still be applied after the polish.

Rust prevention here in the northeast is really the biggest issue. So with that in mind it’s important to recognize most wood has some moisture left and this will significantly cut down on the life of a sharpened saw. One thing I’ve found that helps tremendously is to brush after use. So listen up kids to the Saw Doctor, “Ignore your teeth and they’ll go away!”

sawbrushFun aside, I’d recommend a quick brush off at the end of the day. No need to do it after every use UNLESS it’s a high point dovetail; in that case it can help with a tightly set saw.

I first learned to use a brush when sharpening and once in hand just kept finding great uses for it. It took some searching but I found a US maker that uses “real” bore hair plus a size that works well for cleaning my rasps. If you’re interested, they are for sale on my personal and eBay sites.

Lastly the handle and saw screws…It goes without saying that wood is not indestructible so follow general best practices. Don’t use them as a hammer. Also when cutting with a backsaw pay attention to your depth of cut. Don’t smash the handle into wood trying to get the saw to cut deeper. STOP! Wood does not cut wood well. Reread my blog about saw screws. I find my fair share of broken screws, so easy on the torque, tiger. There’re just defenseless screws.  Lastly feed that wood. Most of you are woodworkers so I’ll leave the finish up to you. Wax is a simple solution; boiled linseed oil is another popular choice. I tend to use shellac and wax as it doesn’t darken the wood or react with other finishes.

Just to recap as I can ramble…

Store saws flat so blades aren’t bent. They can be vertical or horizontal.

Rust prevention is key. Wax, oil or polish all work.

When done using your saw wipe it down and brush loose dust off the tooth line.

Check the handle for play every now and again to see if it needs tightening. If working with a backsaw be mindful of the depth of cut and don’t smack the cheek into your kerf. It’s bad form!

I’m sure a lot more good tips are out there so for sure pass any good ones along and I’ll post for others to enjoy.

JSWwax

The new wagon AKA Sawyer getting a little TLC of it’s own.

Joe Federici AKA the Saw Doctor reminding you:
“If You Ignore Your Teeth, They Will Go Away”

3 thoughts on “TLC sAw Stlye

  1. Laying a saw on the table, for instance, with its blade slightly bent, will NOT result in a bent saw blade. This is an old wive’s tale; it takes force and / or heat to permanently bend an otherwise straight saw plate.
    My credentials? — I have been using, fixing, making, tuning and sharpening saws since 1971.

    • Hey John,

      I would agree and just point out that laying a saw down often invites trouble as they quickly get something shifted or piled on top leading to a bend. I find building a simple peg board the best and simplest. The worst that happens is you put one in front of the other.

      Joe

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